Category Archives: Backup

Veeam Backup & Replication: Backup of Microsoft Active Directory Domain Controller VMs

To backup a virtual machine, Veeam Backup & Replication needs two permissions:

  • permission to access and backup the VM, as well as the
  • permission to do specific tasks inside the VM

to guarantee a consistent backup. The former persmission is granted by the user account that is used to access the VMware vCenter server (sorry for the VMW focust at this point). Usually, this account has the Administrator role granted at the vCenter Server level. The latter permission is granted by a user account that has permissions inside the guest operating system.

geralt / pixabay.com/ Creative Commons CC0

Something I often see in customer environments is the usage of the Domain Administrator account. But why? Because everything works when this account is used!

There are two reasons for this:

  • This account is part of the local Administrator group on every server and client
  • customers tend to grant the Administrator role to the Domain Admins group on vCenter Server level

In simple words: Many customers use the same account to connect to the vCenter, and for the application-aware processing of Veeam Backup & Replication. At least for Windows servers backups.

Houston, we have a problem!

Everything is fine until customers have to secure their environments. One of the very first things customers do, is to protect the Administrator account. And at this point, things might go wrong.

Using a service account to connect to the vCenter server is easy. This can be any account from the Active Directory, or from the embedded VMware SSO domain. I tend to create a dedicated AD-based service account. For the necessary permissions in the vCenter, you can grant this account Administrator permissions, or you can create a new user role in the vCenter. Veeam offers a PDF document which documents the necessary permissions for the different Veeam tasks.

The next challenge is the application-aware processing. For Microsoft SQL Server, the user account must have the sysadmin privileges on the Microsoft SQL Server. For Microsoft Exchange, the user must be member of the local Administrator group. But in case of a Active Directory Domain Contoller things get complicated.

A Domain Controller does not have a local user database (SAM). So what user account or group membership is needed to backup a domain controller using application-aware processing?

This statement is from a great Veeam blog post:

Permissions: Administrative rights for target Active Directory. Account of an enterprise administrator or domain administrator.

So the service account used to backup a domain controller is one of the most powerful accounts in the active directory.

There is no other way. You need a Domain or Enterprise Administrator account. I tend to create a dedicated account for this task.

I recommend to create a service account to connect the vCenter, and which is added to the local Administrator group on the servers to backup, and I create a dedicated Domain/ Enterprise Administrator account to backup the virtual Domain Controllers.

The advantage is that I can change apply different fine-grained password policies to this accounts. Sure, you can add more security by creating more accounts for different servers, and applications, add a dedicated role to the vCenter for Veeam etc. But this apporach is easy enough to implement, and adds a significant amount of user account security to every environment that is still using DOMAIN\Administrator to backup their VMs.

Veeam and StoreOnce: Wrong FC-HBA driver/ firmware causes Windows BSoD

One of my customers bought a very nice new backup solution, which consists of a

  • HPE StoreOnce 5100 with ~ 144 TB usable capacity,
  • and a new HPE ProLiant DL380 Gen10 with Windows Server 2016

as new backup server. StoreOnce and backup server will be connected with 8 Gb Fibre-Channel and 10 GbE to the existing network and SAN. Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 U3a is already in use, as well as VMware vSphere 6.5 Enterprise Plus. The backend storage is a HPE 3PAR 8200.

This setup allows the usage of Catalyst over Fibre-Channel together with Veeam Storage Snapshots, and this was intended to use.

I wrote about a similar setup some month ago: Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array with Veeam Backup & Replication.

The OS on the StoreOnce was up-to-date (3.16.7), Windows Server 2016 was installed using HPE Intelligent Provisioning. Afterwards, a drivers and firmware were updated using the latest SPP 2018.11 was installed. So all drivers and firmware were also up-to-date.

After doing zoning and some other configuration tasks, I installed Veeam Backup and Replication 9.5 U3, configured my Catalyst over Fibre-Channel repository. I configured a test backup… and the server failed with a Blue Screen of Death… which is pretty rare since Server 2008 R2.

geralt / pixabay.com/ Creative Commons CC0

I did some tests:

  • backup from 3PAR Storage Snapshots to Catalyst over FC repository – BSoD
  • backup without 3PAR Storage Snapshots to Catalyst over FC repository – BSoD
  • backup from 3PAR Storage Snapshots to Catalyst over LAN repository – works fine
  • backup without 3PAR Storage Snapshots to Catalyst over LAN repository – works fine
  • backup from 3PAR Storage Snapshots to default repository – works fine
  • backup without 3PAR Storage Snapshots to default repository – works fine

So the error must be caused by the usage of Catalyst over Fibre-Channel. I filed a case at HPE, uploaded gigabytes of memory dumps and heard pretty less during the next week.

HPE StoreOnce Support Matrix FTW!

After a week, I got an email from the HPE support with a question about the installed HBA driver and firmware. I told them the version number and a day later I was requested to downgrade (!) drivers and firmware.

The customer has got a SN1100Q (P9D93A & P9D94A) HBA in his backup server, and I was requested to downgrade the firmware to version 8.05.61, as well as the driver to 9.2.5.20. And with this firmware and driver version, the backup was running fine (~ 750 MB/s hroughput).

I found the HPE StoreOnce Support Matrix on the SPOCK website from HPE. The matrix confirmed the firmware and driver version requirement (click to enlarge).

Fun fact: None of the listed HBAs (except the Synergy HBAs) is supported with the latest StoreOnce G2 products.

Lessons learned

You should take a look at those support matrices – always! HPE confirmed that the first level recommendation “Have you trieed to update to the latest firmware” can cause similar problems. The fact, that the factory ships the server with the latest firmware does not make this easier.

Vembu BDR Suite v4.0 is now generally available

Vembu Technologies was founded in 2002, and with 60.000 customers and more than 4000 partners, Vembu is a leading provider with a comprehensive portfolio of software products and cloud services to small and medium businesses.

Last week, Vembu has announced the availability of Vembu BDR Suite v4.0! Vembu’s new release is all about maintaining business continuity and ensuring high availability. Apart from new features, this release features significant enhancements and bug fixes that are geared towards performance improvement.

Vembu Technologies/ Vembu BDR Essentials/ Copyright by Vembu Technologies

The Vembu BDR Suite

The Vembu BDR Suite is an one stop solution to all your backup and disaster recovery needs. That is what Vembu says about their own product. The BDR Suite covers

  • Backup and replication of VMs running on VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V
  • Backup and bare-metal recovery for physical servers and workstations (Windows Server and Desktop)
  • File and application backups of Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft SharePoint, Microsoft Active Directory, Microsoft Outlook, and MySQL
  • Creating of backup copies and transfer of them to a DR site

More blog posts about Vembu:

Vembu BDR Essentials – affordable backup for SMB customers
The one stop solution for backup and DR: Vembu BDR Suite

What’s new in 4.0?

Vembu BDR Suite v4.0 has got some pretty nice new features. IMHO, there are four highlights:

  • Hyper-V Failover Cluster Support for Backup & Recovery
  • Shared VHDX Backup
  • Hyper-V Checksum Based Incremental, and the
  • Credential Manager

There is a significat chance that you use a Hyper-V Failover Cluster if you have more than one Hyper-V host. With v4.0 Vembu added support for backup and recovery for the VMs residing in a Hyper-V Failover Cluster. Even if the VMs running on Hyper-V cluster move from one host to another, the backups will continue to run without any interruption.

A feature, that I’m really missing in VMware and Veeam, is the support for the backup shared VHDX files. v4.0 added support for this.

Vembu BDR Suite v4.0 also added support bot performing incremental backups with Hyper-V. They call it Checksum based incremental method, but it is in fact Change Block Tracking. An important feature for Hyper-V customers!

The Vembu Credential Manager allows you to store the necessary credentials at one place, use it everywhere inside the Vembu BDR Suite v4.0.

But there are also other, very nice enhancements.

  • Handling new disk addition for VMware ESXi and Hyper-V, which allows the backup of newly added disks at the next backup. In prioir releases, newly added disks were only backuped during the next full backup.
  • Reconnection for VMware ESXi and Hyper-V jobs in case of a dropped network connection
  • Application-wware processing for Hyper-V VMs can now enabled on a per-VM basis
  • API for VM list with Storage utilization report which allows you to generate detailed reports whenever you need one

Interested in trying Vembu BDR suite?, Try a 30-day free trial now! For any questions, simply send an e-mail to vembu-support@vembu.com or follow them on Twitter.

Vembu VMBackup Deployment Scenarios

Vembu was founded in 2002 and has over 60,000 customers worldwide. One of their core products is the Vembu BDR Suite, which is an one stop solution to all your Backup and DR needs. I wrote a longer blog post about the Vembu BDR Suite.

One part of this suite is Vembu VMBackup, which is a data protection solution that is designed to backup VMware and Microsoft Hyper-V virtual machines secure and simple way. The offered features are compareable to Veeam Backup & Replication.

The core component of Vembu VMBackup is the Vembu BDR Backup server, which can be deployed in two ways:

  • On-premises Deployment
  • Hybrid Deployment

virnuls/ pixabay.com/ Creative Commons CC0

On-premises Deployment

In this deployment setup, customers deploy the product in their local environment. I think this is the most typical deployment type, where you install VMBackup on a physical server, in a VM or deployed as virtual appliance. Backup data is transferred  over LAN or SAN, and is written to the storage repositories. The Vembu BDR server acts as a centralized management point, where user can configure and manage backup and replication jobs.

In a simple deployment, the Vembu BDR Backup Server will act as backup proxy and management server instance. It is perfect for a small number of VMs with less simultaneous backup traffic and for VMBackup evaluation. The typical SMB environment.

If you seperate the management server from the backup proxy, the deployment changes to a distributed deployment. If necessary, multiple backup proxies can be deployed on physical hosts or in virtual machines. Customers can also deploy multiple BDR backups servers, which allows load balancing across a cluster of BDR backup servers. Pretty cool for bigger and/ or distributed environments. It allows customers to scale their backup solution over time.

On-Premises Deployment/ Vembu Technologies/ Copyright by Vembu Technologies

Hybrid Deployment

Backup is good, but having a backup copy offsite is better. Vembu OffsiteDR allows customers to create a copy of their backup data and transfer it to a DR location over LAN/ WAN. OffsiteDR instantly transfers backup data from a BDR Backup Server to an OffsiteDR server. Customers can restore failed VMs or missing files and application data in their DR site, or they can rebuild a failed BDR Backup Server from an OffsiteDR server.

Vembu Technologies/ OffsiteDR/ Copyright by Vembu Technologies

If customers don’t have a DR site, they can use Vembu CloudDR push a backup copy to the Vembu cloud. The data stored in the Vembu Cloud can easily be restored at anytime and to any location. Vembu uses AWS across all continents to asure the availability of their cloud services.

Vembu Technologies/ CloudDR/ Copyright by Vembu Technologies

Customers have the choice

It is obvious that customers have the freedom of choice how they deploy Vembu VMBackup.I like the virtual appliance approach, which eliminates the need for additional Windows Server licenses. More and more vendors tend to offer appliances for their products, just think about VMware vCenter Server Appliance, vRealize Orchestrator etc. So why not offer a backup server appliance? I wish other vendors would adopt this…

Another nice feature is the scale-out capability of Vembu. Start small and grow over time. Perfect for SMBs that want to start small and grow over time.

The one stop solution for backup and DR: Vembu BDR Suite

I have worked with a lot of backup software products during my career, but for the last years I have primarily worked with MicroFocus Data Protector (former HP OmniBack, HP Data Protector, or HPE Data Protector), and Veeam Backup & Replication. Data Protector was a great solution for traditional server environments, or when UNIX (HP-UX, AIX, Solaris etc.) compatibility was required. Features like Zero Downtime Backups, LAN-free or Direct SAN backups were available for many years. But their code quality has suffered severely in the recent years. The product no longer seemed like a one-stop shop. Some months ago, HPE sold its software division to MicroFocus and started to sell Veeam Backup & Replication through its channel. Some months prior selling the complete software division, HPE acquired Trilead, which is many of us well known because of their VM Explorer. Sad but true: Data Protector is dead to me.

I think I don’t have to say much about Veeam. Veeam is unbeaten when it comes down to virtualized server environments, and they constantly add features and extend their product portfolio. Think about their solutions Office 365, or Veeam Agent for Windows and Linux.

Why Vembu?

It is always good to have more than product in the portfolio, just because to give customers the choice between different products. If your only tool is a hammer, everthing looks like a nail. That is why I took a closer look at Vembu. I became aware of Vembu, because they asked to place an ad on vcloudnine. This was a year ago. So it was obvious to take a look at their products. Furthermore, Vembu and its products were mentioned many times in my Twitter timeline. Two good reasons to take a look at them!

Vembu Technologies was founded in 2002, and with 60.000 customers and more than 4000 partners, Vembu is a leading provider with a comprehensive portfolio of software products and cloud services to small and medium businesses. We are not talking about a newcomer!

The Vembu BDR Suite

The Vembu BDR Suite is an one stop solution to all your backup and disaster recovery needs. That is what Vembu says about their own product. The BDR Suite covers

  • Backup and replication of VMs running on VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V
  • Backup and bare-metal recovery for physical servers and workstations (Windows Server and Desktop)
  • File and application backups of Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft SharePoint, Microsoft Active Directory, Microsoft Outlook, and MySQL
  • Creating of backup copies and transfer of them to a DR site

Let’s have a more detailed look at the Vembu BDR Suite. This is a picture of the overall architecture.

Vembu Technologies/ Vembu BDR Suite architecture/ Copyright by Vembu Technologies

VMBackup

VMBackup provides fast, efficient and agentless backup for VMs hosted on VMware ESXi and on Microsoft Hyper-V. It also provides the capability to replicate virtual machines from one ESXi host to another ESXi (VMreplication). You might guess it – This feature is only available for VMware ESXi. In case of Microsoft Hyper-V, you have to use the built-in Hyper-V replication. The failover and failback of replicated VMs is managed by the BDR Backup Server. VMBackup offers instant VM recovery, recovery of single files and folder from image-level backups, and recovery of application items from Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft SharePoint, and Microsoft Active Directory. The functionality is similar to what you know from other products, like Veeam Backup & Replication, or MicroFocus Data Protector. VMBackup is licensed per socket, and it is available in a Standard (~ 150 $ per socket) and an Enterprise (~ 250 $ per socket) edition.

ImageBackup

ImageBackup addresses something, that might be extinct for some of us: Physical servers, like physical database or file servers. It can take image backups of Windows servers and workstations. This allows customers to restore the entire server or workstation from scratch to the same, or to new hardware. ImageBackup utilizes the Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) to create a consistent backup of a physical machine. Customers can restore a backup to the bare-metal, restore single files and folders, as well as application items from Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft SharePoint, and Microsoft Active Directory. If necessary, the can be restored to a supported hypervisor. With other words: P2V migration. ImageBackup is licensed per host, or per application server if you wish to take backups of applications like Microsoft Exchange or SQL server. ImageBackup for servers costs ~ 150 $, and it is free for workstations.

NetworkBackup

NetworkBackup addresses the backup of files, folders and application data from Windows, Mac and Linux clients. It is designed to protect business data across file servers, application servers, workstations and other endpoints. It does not take an image backup, but full and incremental backups. The feature set and use case of NetworkBackup is similar to “traditional” backup software like MicroFocus Data Protector or ARCServe. NetworkBackup offers intelligent scheduling policies, bandwidth management and flexible retention polices. Clients are not always onsite, to address this, NetworkBackup can store its data in the Vembu Cloud (Vembu Cloud Services). NetworkBackup is licensed per file server (~ 60 $ per server), application server (~ 150 $), or workstation (free).

OffsiteDR

OffsiteDR creates and transfers backup copies to a DR site. Data is immediately transferred when it arrives at the backup server. The Data is encrypted in-flight using industry-standard AES 256 encryption. WAN optimization is included, which means that data is compressed, encrypted and deduplicated before being replicated to the OffsiteDR server. The recovery of VMs and files can directly be done from the OffsiteDR server. So there is no need to setup a new backup server in case of a disaster recovery. OffsiteDR covers different recovery screnarios, like instantly recover machines directly from the Vembu OffsiteDR server, bare-metal restore using the Vembu Recovery CD, or restore the virtual machine as on a VMware ESXi or Microsoft Hyper-V server directly from the Vembu OffsiteDR server. OffsiteDR is an add-on to VMBackup, and it is licensed per CPU socket (~ 90 $).

Universal Explorer

The Universal Explorer is used to restore items from various Microsoft applications, like Microsoft Exchange, SQL Server, SharePoint, or Active Directory. An item can be an email, a mailbox, complete databases, user or group objects etc. These items are sourced from image-level backups of physical and virtual machines. You might see some similarities to Veeam Explorer. Both products are comparable.

Recovery CD

The Vembu Recovery CD can be used to recover physical or virtual maschines. Drivers for the target platform will be injected during the restore. This is pretty handy in case of P2P and V2P migrations.

Licensing & Editions

Vembu offers a subscription and a perpetual license model. The subscription model can be purchased on a monthly or yearly basis, such as 1, 2, 3 or 5 years. It includes 24/ 7 standard technical support, updates and upgrades throughout the licensed period. The perpetual licensing model allows you to purchase and use the Vembu BDR suite by paying a single fee. This includes free maintenance and support for the first year.

Visit the pricing page for more detailed information. A Vembu BDR Suite edition comparison is also available.

Final thoughts

With 60.000 customers and 4000 partners, Vembu is not a newcomer in the backup business. The product portfolio is quite comprehensive. The Vembu BDR Suite offers industry standard features to a very sweet price. I can’t see any feature, that a SMB customer might require, which is not available. In sum, the Vembu BDR suite seems to me to be a very good alternative to the top dogs in the backup business, especially if we are talkin about SMB customers.

Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array with Veeam Backup & Replication

When taking a backup with Veeam Backup & Replication, a VM snapshot is created to get a consistent state of the VM. The snapshot is taken prior the backup, and it is removed after the successful backup of the VM. The snapshot grows during its lifetime, and you should keep in mind, that you need some free space in the datastore for snapshots. This can be a problem, especially in case of multiple VM backups at a time, and if the VMs share the same datastore.

Benefit of storage snapshots

If your underlying storage supports the creation of storage snapshots, Veeam offers an additional way to create a consistent state of the VMs. In this case, a storage snapshot is taken, which is presented to the backup proxy, and is then used to backup the data. As you can see: No VM snapshot is taken.

Now one more thing: If you have a replication or synchronous mirror between two storage systems, Veeam can do this operation on the secondary array. This is pretty cool, because it takes load from you primary storage!

Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array

Last week I was able to try something new: Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array. A customer has two HPE 3PAR StoreServ 8200 in a Peer Persistence setup, a HPE StoreOnce, and a physical Veeam backup server, which also acts as Veeam proxy. Everything is attached to a pretty nice 16 Gb dual Fabric SAN. The customer uses Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 U3a. The data was taken from the secondary 3PAR StoreServ and it was pushed via FC into a Catalyst Store on a StoreOnce. Using the Catalyst API allows my customer to use Synthetic Full backups, because the creation is offloaded to StoreOnce. This setup is dramatically faster and better than the prior solution based on MicroFocus Data Protector. Okay, this last backup solution was designed to another time with other priorities and requirements. it was a perfect fit at the time it was designed.

This blog post from Veeam pointed me to this new feature: Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array. Until I found this post, it was planned to use “traditional” storage snapshots, taken from the primary 3PAR StoreServ.

With this feature enabled, Veeam takes the snapshot on the 3PAR StoreServ, that is hosting the synchronous mirrored virtual volume. This graphic was created by Veeam and shows the backup workflow.

Veeam/ Backup process/ Copyright by Veeam

My tests showed, that it’s blazing fast, pretty easy to setup, and it takes unnecessary load from the primary storage.

In essence, there are only three steps to do:

  • add both 3PARs to Veeam
  • add the registry value and restart the Veeam Backup Server Service
  • enable the usage of storage snapshots in the backup job

How to enable this feature?

To enable this feature, you have to add a single registry value on the Veeam backup server, and afterwards restart the Veeam Backup Server service.

  • Location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Veeam\Veeam Backup and Replication\
  • Name: Hp3PARPeerPersistentUseSecondary
  • Type: REG_DWORD (0 False, 1 True)
  • Default value: 0 (disabled)

Thanks to Pierre-Francois from Veeam for sharing his knowledge with the community. Read his blog post Backup from a secondary HPE 3PAR StoreServ array for additional information.

Veeam backups fails because of time differences

Last week I had an interesting incident at a customer. The customer reported that one of multiple Veeam backup jobs jobs constantly failed.

jarmoluk/ pixabay.com/ Creative Commons CC0

The backup job included two VMs, and the backup of one of these VMs failed with this error:

The verified the used credentials for that job, but re-entering the password does not solved the issue. I then checked the Veeam backup logs located under %ProgramData%\Veeam\Backup (look for the Agent.Job_Name.Source.VM_Name.vmdk.log) and found VDDK Error 3014:

The user, that was used to connect to the vCenter, was an Active Directory located account. The account were granted administrator privileges root of the vCenter. Switching from an AD located account to Administrator@vsphere.local solved the issue. Next stop: vmware-sts-idmd.log on the vCenter Server appliance. The error found in this log confirmed my theory, that there was an issue with the authentication itself, not an issue with the AD located account.

To make a long story short: Time differences. The vCenter, the ESXi hosts and some servers had the wrong time. vCenter and ESXi hosts were using the Domain Controllers as time source.

This is the ntpq  output of the vCenter. You might notice the jitter values on the right side, both noted in milliseconds.

After some investigation, the root cause seemed to be a bad DCF77 receiver, which was connected to the domain controller that was hosting the PDC Emulator role. The DCF77 receiver was connected using an USB-2-LAN converter. Instead of using a DCF77 receiver, the customer and I implemented a NTP hierarchy using a valid NTP source on the internet (pool.ntp.org).

HPE Data Protector 9.08 is available

This posting is ~2 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

3 days ago, on 13th October 2016, HPE has released patch bundle 9,08 for Data Protector 9. A patch bundle isn’t a directly installable version, instead it’s a bundle of patches and enhancements for a specific version of Data Protector, in this case Data Protector 9.

Beside fixes for discovered problems, a patch bundle includes also enhancements. There are some enhancements in this patch bundle, that have caught my attention particularly.

QCCR2A64053: Support for object copy of file system data to Microsoft Azure. Data Protector now supports the creation of a special backup device, which can be used together with Data Protector object copies, to copy Data Protector file system backups to Azure Backup Vaults. This is an easy way to create copies of important data on Microsoft Azure.

Contemporaneous with the announcement of Data Protector 9.08, I got an e-mail of HPE with the information, that one of my change request has made it into the latest patch bundle:

QCCR2A68100: VMWARE GRE stays in debug mode. I have observed this behaviour in different Data Protector installations: If debugging isn’t explicitly disabled (OB2DBG=0 in the omnirc), the VMware GRE always writes debug logs. Regardless if debugging is enabled or disabled in the GRE configuration.

Because of some security related changes and fixes in Data Protector 9.08, HPE has marked this patch bundle as critical.

Download Data Protector patch bundle 9.08:

Data Protector 9.08 for Windows

Data Protector 9.08 for HP-UX/IA

Data Protector 9.08 for Linux/64

Data Protector: Copy sessions to encrypted devices fail after update to 9.07

This posting is ~2 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

Recently, a customer has informed me, that copy sessions to encrypted devices failed, after he has made an update to Data Protector 9.07. The copy sessions failed with this error:

The customer uses tape encryption. The destination for the backups is a HPE StoreOnce, and a post-backup copy creates a copy of the data on tape. Backup to disk was running fine, but the copy to tape failed immediately.

The customer has opened a ticket at the HPE support and got instantly a hotfix to resolve this issue. HPE has documented this error in QCCR2A69192. If you run into the same issue, please request hotfix QCCR2A69802. This hotfix consolidates QCCR2A69192 and QCCR2A69318 (The BMA ends abnormally during backup/copy to tape).

Thanks to Stefan for the hint!

End of support for HPE Data Protector 7.0x & 8.0x

This posting is ~3 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

Today I got an email from HPE, which has informed me of the imminent end of support for HPE Data Protector 7.0x 8.0x. As of June 30, 2016, HPE will offer no new updates or patches for Data Protector 7.0x and 8.0x. This means that

  • Telephone and email support
  • new security updates, and
  • new product updates

will be phased out. The self-help support will be continued until June 30, 2018. Self-help includes access to the knowledge base, current patches and access to known problems.

Data Protector 8.1x will be under support until June 30, 2017. The self-help support for Data Protector 8.1x will be continued until June 30, 2019.

Please note, that you need new license keys if you want to update Data Protector 7.0x or 8.0x to Data Protector 9. To gain new license keys, you need an active support contract. If you have valid Data Protector 8.1 license keys, you don’t need new license keys.

Don’t hesitate to leave a comment if you need further information.