Category Archives: Storage

Checking the 3PAR Quorum Witness appliance

Two 3PAR StoreServs running in a Peer Persistence setup lost the connection to the Quorum Witness appliance. The appliance is an important part of a 3PAR Peer Persistence setup, because it acts as a tie-breaker in a split-brain scenario.

While analyzing this issue, I saw this message in the 3PAR Management Console:

In addition to that, the customer got e-mails that the 3PAR StoreServ arrays lost the connection to the Quorum Witness appliance. In my case, the CouchDB process died. A restart of the appliance brought it back online. read more

HPE 3PAR OS updates that fix VMware VAAI ATS Heartbeat issue

Customers that use HPE 3PAR StoreServs with 3PAR OS 3.2.1 or 3.2.2 and VMware ESXi 5.5 U2 or later, might notice one or more of the following symptoms:

  • hosts lose connectivity to a VMFS5 datastore
  • hosts disconnect from the vCenter
  • VMs hang during I/O operations
  • you see the messages like these in the vobd.log or vCenter Events tab

  • you see the following messages in the vmkernel.log

Interestingly, not only HPE is affected by this. Multiple vendors have the same issue. VMware described this issue in KB2113956. HPE has published a customer advisory about this.

Workaround

If you have trouble and you can update, you can use this workaround. Disable ATS heartbeat for VMFS5 datastores. VMFS3 datastores are not affected by this issue. To disable ATS heartbeat, you can use this PowerCLI one-liner: read more

HPE StoreVirtual – Managers and Quorum

HPE StoreVirtual is a scale-out storage platform, that is designed to meet the needs of virtualized environments. It’s based on LeftHand OS and because the magic is a piece of software, HPE StoreVirtual is available as HPE ProLiant/ BladeSystem-based hardware, or as Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) for VMware ESXi, Microsoft Hyper-V and KVM. It comes with an all-inclusive enterprise feature set. This feature set provides

  • Storage clustering
  • Network RAID
  • Thin Provisioning (with support for space reclamation)
  • Snapshots
  • Asynchronous and synchronous replication across multiple sites
  • Automated software upgrades and self-healing storage
  • Adaptive Optimization (Tiering)

The license is alway all-inclusive. There is no need to license individual features. read more

HPE StoreVirtual REST API

Representational State Transfer (REST) APIs are all the rage. REST was defined by Roy Thomas Fielding in his PhD dissertation “Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architectures“. The architectural style of REST describes six constraints:

  • Uniform interface
  • Stateless
  • Cacheable
  • Client – Server communication
  • Layered system
  • Code on demand

RESTful APIs typically use HTTP and HTTP verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.) to send data to, or retrieve data from remote systems. To do so, REST APIs use Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) to interact with remote systems. Thus, a client can interact with a remote system over a REST API using standard HTTP URIs and HTTP verbs. For the data transfer, common internet media types, like JSON or XML are used. It’s important to understand that REST is not a standard per se. But most implementations make use of standards such as HTTP, URI, JSON or XML. read more

Automating ESXi configuration for DataCore SANsymphony-V

DataCore describes in their Host Configuration Guide for VMware ESXi some settings that must be adjusted before storage from DataCore SANsymphony-V storage servers will be assigned to the ESXi hosts. Today, for ESXi 5.x and 6.0, you have to add a custom rule and adjust the advanced setting DiskMaxIOSize. For ESX(i) 4 more parameters had to be adjusted. But I will focus on  ESXi 5.x and 6.0. You need to adjust these settings for each host that should get storage mapped from a DataCore storage server. If you have more then one host, you may have the wish to automate the necessary steps. The check the current value of DiskMaxIOSize, you can use this lines of PowerCLI code. read more

Use Windows MPIO for DataCore backend storage connections

When you install DataCore SANsymphony-V (SSV), you will be asked during the setup to allow the installation of some special drivers. DataCore SANSymphony-V needs this drivers to act as a storage target for hosts and other storage servers. Usually you have three different port roles in a DataCore SSV setup:

  • Frontend Ports (FE)
  • Mirror Ports (MR)
  • Backend Ports (BE)

Frontend (FE) ports act only in target-only mode. These ports will be disabled, if you stop a DataCore storage server. Mirror (MR) ports (can) act as target AND initiator. You can set (if you like) a mirror port to a specific mode (target or initiator), but I wouldn’t recomment this. Theoretically you can set one MR port to act as initiator, and a second to target-only mode. If the port is set to target-only, the port is also stopped when the DataCore storage server is stopped. A backend (BE) port acts as initiator for backend storage. Usually the FE ports act as target-only, the MR as target/ initiator and the BE ports as initiator-only. If you use local storage (or SAS connected), there will be no BE ports. read more

First experience: Nexsan E-Series

One of my longtime DataCore customers has started a project to replace their current DataCore storage servers and backend storage with new hardware. In opposite of the current setup, the newly installed backend storage is now FC-attached. The customer has selected Nexsan E-Series E32V, E32XV and E48V storage systems in combination with DataCore SANsymphony-V10.

Who is Nexsan?

The question should be: Who is Imation? Nexsan was founded in 1999 in Derby, England, but was aquired by Imation in December 2012. Since December 2012, Nexsan is one of Imations brands and offers, as a storage-only company, three different product lines: Assureon Secure StorageE-Series High Density Storage and NST Hybrid Storage. read more

Chicken-and-egg problem: 3PAR VSP 4.3 MU1 & 3PAR OS 3.2.1 MU3

Since monday I’m helping a customer to put two HP 3PAR StoreServ 7200c into operation. Both StoreServs came factory-installed with 3PAR OS 3.2.1 MU3, which is available since July 2015. Usually, the first thing you do is to deploy the 3PAR Service Processor (SP). These days this is (in most cases) a Virtual Service Processor (VSP). The SP is used to initialize the storage system. Later, the SP reports to HP and it’s used for maintenance tasks like shutdown the StoreServ, install updates and patches. There are only a few cases in which you start the Out-of-the-Box (OOTB) procedure of the StoreServ without having a VSP. I deployed two (one VSP for each StoreServ) VSPs, started the Service Processor Setup Wizard, entered the StoreServ serial number and got this message: read more

DataCore mirrored virtual disks full recovery fails repeatedly

Last sunday a customer suffered a power outage for a few hours. Unfortunately the DataCore Storage Server in the affected datacenter weren’t shutdown and therefore it crashed. After the power was back, the Storage Server was started and the recoveries for the mirrored virtual disks started. Hours later, three mirrored virtual disks were still running full recoveries and the recovery for each of them failed repeatedly.

virtual_disk_error_ds10_mirror

The recovery ran until a specific point, failed and started again. When the recovery failed, several events were logged on the Storage Server in the other datacenter (the Storage Server that wasn’t affected from the power outage): read more

Tiering? Caching? Why it’s important to differ between them.

Some days ago I talked to a colleague from our sales team and we discussed different solutions for a customer. I will spare you the details, but we discussed different solutions and we came across PernixData FVP, HP 3PAR Adaptive OptimizationHP 3PAR Adaptive Flash Cache and DataCore SANsymphony-V. And then the question of all questions came up: “What is the difference?”.

Simplify, then add Lightness

Lets talk about tiering. To make it simple: Tiering moves a block from one tier to another, depending on how often a block is accessed in a specific time. A tier is a class of storage with specific characteristics, for example ultra-fast flash, enterprise-grade SAS drives or even nearline drives. Characteristics can be the drive type, the used RAID level or a combination of characteristics. A 3-tier storage design can consist of only one drive type, but they can be organized in different RAID levels. Tier 1 can be RAID 1 and tier 3 can be RAID 6, but all tiers use enterprise-grade 15k SAS drives. But you can also mix drive types and RAID levels, for example tier 1 with flash, tier 2 with 15k SAS in a RAID 5 and tier 3 with SAS-NL and RAID 6. Each time a block is accessed, the block “heats up”. If it’s hot enough, it is moved one tier up. If it’s less often accessed, the block “cools down” and at a specific point, the block is moved a tier down. If a tier is full, colder blocks will to be moved down and hotter block have to be moved up. It’s a bit simplified, but products like DataCore SANsymphony-V with Auto-Tiering or HP 3PAR Adaptive Optimization are working this way. read more