Tag Archives: certification

VCAP6.5-DCV Design – Objective 2.1 Map business requirements to a vSphere 6.x logical design

The last few weeks have been quite busy. Time to focus on exam preparation again. Let’s start with the first objective of the second section.

This blog post covers objective 2.1 (Map business requirements to a vSphere 6.x logical design) of the VCAP6.5-DCV Design exam. It is based on the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 in Data Center Virtualization Design (3V0-624) Exam Preparation Guide (last update August 2017).

The necessary skills and abilities are documented in the exam prep guide for the older VCAP6-DCV Design exam (3V0-622). I think they also apply to the current version of the exam:

  • Analyze requirements for functional and non-functional elements
  • Build non-functional requirements into a specific logical design
  • Translate stated business requirements into a logical design
  • Incorporate the current state of a customer environment into a logical design

Let’s start with

Analyze requirements for functional and non-functional elements

Functional and non-functional elements sounds familiar. I wrote about functional and non-functional requirements in the previous objective 1.3 (Determine risks, requirements, constraints, and assumptions). When we talk about requirements, we have to differ between functional (WHAT) and non-functional (HOW) requirements. Some examples:

  • Solution must comply with ISO standards
  • The uptime must be at a minimum of 99,9%
  • Users must be able deploy new virtual machine within 15 minutes after approval

This step is about analyzing the requirements and check if it is a functional or a non-functional element. Check this examples:

Requirementfunctional/ non-functional
Solution must comply with ISO standardsfunctional
The uptime must be at a minumum of 99,9% functional
Existing contracts must be used for purchasing server hardwarenon-functional
PowerShell has to be used for automation tasks non-functional

Remember: We have to differ between WHAT (functional) and HOW (non-functional).

Build non-functional requirements into a specific logical design

A logical design is more detailed compared to the conceptual design. A conceptual design is an abstract or high level design. The logical design contains more information, is more low-level than a conceptual design. The purpose of a logical design is refine the conceptual design and add more details and information.

With the determined and categorized requirements we can start to add more details to our design, for example we can define, that server hardware will be purchased from DELL or HPE. Or that we don’t need traditional, dedicated shared storage, because the solution must be hyper-converged.

Pretty important: A requirement is a requirement, regardless how dumb it is. This is pretty important for the exam – and your job. ;)

Translate stated business requirements into a logical design

This is pretty similar to the written above. You have to take the business requirements into account. Similar to the section above, business requirements can also be categorized into functional or non-functional elements.

Incorporate the current state of a customer environment into a logical design

If your customer is not asking for a greenfield deployment, you have to take the current environment of the customer into account. The solution must fit into the current environment. Of course, this results in further requirements that have to be fulfilled.

Summary

The main aspect of this objective is to review all requirements, determine if they are functional or non-functional, and use them to create a logical design. A logical design does not contain IP addresses or VLANs. But it contains all major components and their relationships, like data flows and connections.

Links

VCAP6.5-DCV Design – Objective 1.3 Determine risks, requirements, constraints, and assumptions

This blog post covers objective 1.3 (Determine risks, requirements, constraints, and assumptions) of the VCAP6.5-DCV Design exam. It is based on the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 in Data Center Virtualization Design (3V0-624) Exam Preparation Guide (last update August 2017).

The first objective of the exam prep guide has covered the business requirements. Now we have to do similar for the affected applications.

The necessary skills and abilities are documented in the exam prep guide for the older VCAP6-DCV Design exam (3V0-622). I think they also apply to the current version of the exam:

  • Differentiate between the concepts of risks, requirements, constraints, and assumptions
  • Given a statement, determine whether it is a risk, requirement, constraint, or an assumption
  • Analyze impact of VMware best practices to identified risks, constraints, and assumptions

Differentiate between the concepts of risks, requirements, constraints, and assumptions

I wrote a couple of times about risks, requirements, constraints and assumptions, but I missed to explain the meaning of each of these terms. I will use the following order:

  • requirements
  • risks
  • constraints
  • assumptions

So let us start with “What is a requirement“? A requirement is something that a has to be achieved. This can be applied to business or technical things. Without defined requirements, you would have no clue what your design should cover. If you define a requirement, you should test it with the following question: Is the defined requirement

  • specific
  • feasable
  • verifiable
  • traceable
  • unambiguous

When we talk about requirements, we have to differ between functional (WHAT) and non-functional (HOW) requirements. Some examples:

  • Solution must comply with ISO standards
  • The uptime must be at a minumum of 99,9%
  • Users must be able deploy new virtual machine within 15 minutes after approval

A Risks is a potential event, that might prevent us from achieving the defined project goals, or which can cause that the project completely fails. They are often common points in every projekct. The best we can do is to identify and list every risk that might prevent us from successfully finish the project. Some examples:

  • Missing the delivery date
  • Vendor discontinued parts of the solution
  • Hidden incompatibility with currently used frameworks

Constraints can be a limiting factor when we design our solution. They can be understood as cornerstones that set the borders of our solution. Contraints are always very specific. Examples:

  • The costs per user must not exceed 5 €
  • The project has to be finished withing 9 months
  • The solution must include servers from HPE

In opposite to constraints, which are very specific, assumptions are considered to be true without proof in the planning phase. This is pretty important! We are talking about the time, when we put our design together. Examples:

  • Rackspace will be available when the HW needs to be deployed
  • A MS SQL database server will be available at the installation date
  • A specific decision is made when needed

Summary

As I wrote at the beginning of this article: It is important to understand these terms. In simple words:

  • requirements: Things that have to met to successfully finish the project
  • risks: Things that might happen and that put our project at risk
  • constraints: Limiting factors to our project design
  • assumptions: Things that are considered to be true, but that are not proofed during the planning phase

That is a pretty simple summary, but it should be good enough to be memorized. :)

Links

VCAP6.5-DCV Design – Objective 1.2 Gather and analyze application requirements

This blog post covers objective 1.2 (Gather and analyze application requirements) of the VCAP6.5-DCV Design exam. It is based on the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 in Data Center Virtualization Design (3V0-624) Exam Preparation Guide (last update August 2017).

The first objective of the exam prep guide has covered the business requirements. Now we have to do similar for the affected applications.

The necessary skills and abilities are documented in the exam prep guide for the older VCAP6-DCV Design exam (3V0-622). I think they also apply to the current version of the exam:

  • Gather and analyze application requirements for a given scenario
  • Determine the requirements for a set of applications that will be included in the design
  • Collect information needed in order to identify application dependencies
  • Given one or more application requirements, determine the impact of the requirements on the design

Gather and analyze application requirements for a given scenario

As a result of our already done work, we should know with what applications we have to deal in our project. Now ee have to gather the requirements of those applications. The necessary techniques are already known to us:

  • interviews with the relevant stakeholders and/ or developers or engineers
  • existing documentation about the deployment
  • our documented baseline from objective 1.1
  • vendor documentation/ support/ knowledge base articles

It is pretty important to understand what requirements these applications have. It depends on the workload and the applications itself. Tools like perfmon or capacity planning tools can help us to get a solid knowledge about the current and planned capacity/ performance requirements.

But we should not only focus on performance. There is much more to take into account, to be more specific: AMPRS

It stands for

  • Availability
  • Manageability
  • Performance
  • Recoverability, and
  • Security

You can read an detailed explanation here.

Determine the requirements for a set of applications that will be included in the design

This is similar to the written above. When we talk about a set of applications, we have to take the dependencies between these applications into account.

Collect information needed in order to identify application dependencies

To gain the necessary information, we have to talk to the right people, which means that we have to talk to developers, engineers and/ or end-users. We have to deep dive into existing customer and/ or vendor documentation. And we need to use the right tools to map the found dependencies. This can be done with Microsoft Visio, OmniGraffle or similar.

Given one or more application requirements, determine the impact of the requirements on the design

With the knowledge about the applications and the dependencies between them, it is time to make some design decisions. These decisions must support the documented requirements, especially when we think about the requirements in regard of availability, manageability, performance, recoverability, and security.

The key is to understand the impact of the made decisions for the rest of the design.

Summary

I will try to summarize this objective. The last blog post has covered the business requirements and the process from gathering the required information, over the documentation, until the point at which we can start creating a design. This blog post covers the same, but not for the business requirements, but for the applications and the requirements of these applications.

We can gather the necessary information by talking to the relevant stakeholders, engineers, developers etc. Customer and/ or vendor documentation and other sources can be used to get a better understanding of the different application requirements. We also need to understand the dependencies between the different applications, especially if only a subset of applications is virtualized. Our work is supported by different tools, especially for performance analysis, capacity planning and documentation.

With the gathered information we will able to make design decisions that fulfill the requirements (Think about AMPRS).

Links

VCAP6.5-DCV Design – Objective 1.1 Gather and analyze business requirements

This blog post covers objective 1.1 (Gather and analyze business requirements) of the VCAP6.5-DCV Design exam. It is based on the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 in Data Center Virtualization Design (3V0-624) Exam Preparation Guide (last update August 2017).

When you get the task to design something , you will instinctively start gathering information about the requirements that have to be fulfilled. Everything IT is doing should support the business in some way.

The necessary skills and abilities are documented in the exam prep guide for the older VCAP6-DCV Design exam (3V0-622). I think they also apply to the current version of the exam:

  • Associate a stakeholder with the information that needs to be collected
  • Utilize inventory and assessment data from a current environment to define a baseline state
  • Analyze customer interview data to explicitly define customer objectives for a conceptual design
  • Determine customer priorities for defined objectives
  • Ensure that Availability, Manageability, Performance, Recoverability and Security (AMPRS) considerations are applied during the requirements gathering process
  • Given results of the requirements gathering process, identify requirements for a conceptual design
  • Categorize requirements by infrastructure qualities to prepare for logical design requirements

Associate a stakeholder with the information that needs to be collected

Let’s start with the stakeholders and why they are important for us. But what is a stakeholder? A stakeholder is a person with an interest or concern in something, especially a business (Oxford). Stakeholders can be internal or external parties. An internal stakeholder is someone with a direct relationship to the company. An external stakeholder has no direct connection to the company, but it is affected in some way. This can be suppliers, the government, or other groups. A stakeholder can be anyone, but in our context stakeholders are typically

  • C-Level Executives (CEO, CFO, CIO etc.)
  • Vice Presidents
  • Managers, but also
  • Engineers and end users

As always: It depends. :)

Utilize inventory and assessment data from a current environment to define a baseline state

We also need to understand the current environment and what is currently deployed at the company. Interviews with the stakeholders are important, but in most cases they will not answer all questions. Depending on what is currently deployed, different tools can be used to gain the necessary data. Some examples:

  • RVTools, PowerCLI, vSphere Web Client, vROps etc
  • Custom scripts
  • Windows Server Manager
  • Network Monitoring Tools, like HPE Intelligent Management Center
  • Asset Management

It is important to document the results of the assessment. This is the baseline state of the current environment.

Analyze customer interview data to explicitly define customer objectives for a conceptual design

Now we need to get back to the results of the interviews that we did with the stakeholders to define the goals and the scope of the design. We also need to understant the the

  • Constraints
  • Assumptions,
  • Requirements, and
  • Risks

When we talk about requirements, we have to differ between functional (WHAT) and non-functional (HOW) requirements.

These information will allow us to create a conceptual design, which is written down in a workbook document.

Determine customer priorities for defined objectives

The next step is to define the priorities over the defined objectives. It is important to weight e.g. requirements and risks. Milestones have to be defined. They will help us to measure the success of the project and keep it on track.

Ensure that AMPRS considerations are applied during the requirements gathering process

AMPRS stands for

  • Availability
  • Manageability
  • Performance
  • Recoverability, and
  • Security

It is important to understand the meaning of each of these terms.

Availability considerations address the availability requirements of our design. These are typically expressed by percent uptime of a specific system. For example: 99,5% availability for file services.

Manageability considerations address the management and operational requirements of our design. This can be alerting, reports, access concepts etc.

Performance considerations express the required performance characteristics of the design. For example: Mails per second by a given size.

Recoverability considerations cover the ability to recover from an unexpected incident or disaster. This topic typically addresses backup and recovery of our design.

Security considerations cover the requirements around data control, access management, governance, risk management etc.

Given results of the requirements gathering process, identify requirements for a conceptual design

Now we have collected information from the relevant stakeholders, including the goals, scope, and CARR (constraints, assumptions, requirements, risks), and we have collected details about the current environment. Now it is time to put these information together and create a conceptual design.

The conceptual design must be approved by the stakeholders. This assures that everything is covered. Creating a conceptual design is an iterative process. The conceptual design is finished when the relevant stakeholders have approved it.

Categorize requirements by infrastructure qualities to prepare for logical design requirements

Sounds simple, but it can be challenging: The documented requirements have to be grouped by infrastructure categories, eg.

  • Networking
  • Storage
  • Recovery
  • Compute
  • VM
  • Security

Based on the CARR and the AMPRS considerations, we made design decisions. These decisions affect each of the infrastructure categories. At this point, we can review each of our decisions and mapping the requirements to the infrastructure will ease the creation of a high-level logical design.

Summary

Let me try to simplify this complex process a bit.

We were asked to solve a problem for a company. To solve this problem, we have to design a solution. To create this design, we have to identify the relevant stakeholders. These stakeholders will help us to gather information about the goals, the scope, about constraints, assumptions, requirements and risks. Especially when it comes to the requirements, we have to take availability, manageability, performance, recoverability and security considerations into account.

We can use different tools to collect information about the current environment.

At this point we know WHAT the company want, and we know WHAT they are currently running.

Now we can start with the creation of a conceptual design, which has to be approved by the relevant stakeholders.

To prepare the logical design, we need to map the documented requirements to the different categories of the infrastructure.

Links

VMware Certified Advanced Professional — Data Center Virtualization Design 2019 Study Guide

Last year in September I’ve passed the VCAP6-DCV Deployment exam. After a busy first half of 2019 it’s time to start preparing the VMware Certified Advanced Professional — Data Center Virtualization Design 2019 exam.

There are many great study guides out there, but in most cases I need “my own study guide” to feel well prepared. I hope the step to publish my notes helps me to stay focused and motivated.

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

In opposite to the Deploy exam, the Design exam is a MC exam. 135 Minutes for 60 questions. Sounds easy, but it’s told that it’s one of the hardest exams available by VMware.

The exam is split into three sections:

  • Section 1 – Create a vSphere 6.5 Conceptual Design
  • Section 2 – Create a vSphere 6.x Logical Design from an Existing Conceptual Design
  • Section 3 – Create a vSphere 6.x Physical Design from an Existing Logical Design

Each section contains several objects.

  • Objective 2.1 – Map business requirements to a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 2.2 – Map service dependencies
  • Objective 2.3 – Build availability requirements into a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 2.4 – Build manageability requirements into a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 2.5 – Build performance requirements into a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 2.6 – Build recoverability requirements into a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 2.7 – Build security requirements into a vSphere 6.x logical design
  • Objective 3.1 – Transition from a logical design to a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.2 – Create a vSphere 6.x physical network design from an existing logical design
  • Objective 3.3 – Create a vSphere 6.x physical storage design from an existing logical design
  • Objective 3.4 – Determine appropriate computer resources for a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.5 – Determine virtual machine configuration for a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.6 – Determine data center management options for a vSphere 6.x physical design

I will try to cover each objective in a blog post and add a link here. Feel free to add comments, corrections and questions. :)

Exam prep & experience: Citrix NetScaler Advanced Topics: Security, Management, and Optimization (1Y0-340)

In May 2018, Citrix released their new Citrix Certified Expert – Networking certification, which completet the networking certification path at the upper end (blog post on training.citrix.com). The track starts with the Associate (CCA-N), the lower-level certification is a requirement for achieving the higher-level certification, continues with the Professional (CCP-N), and ends with the Expert (CCE-N) certification. This is pretty cool, and I’m very happy that Citrix now offers the CCE-N, because the expert-level certification was missing all the time.

kmicican/ pixabay.com/ Creative Commons CC0

Everything is cool… except you have passed exam 1Y0-351 to gain your CCP-N. In this case, you have to pass 1Y0-340 until Dec 31 2018. Otherwise you have to start with the CCA-N, after the validity period of your CCP-N is over (3y after passing the exam).

Bad move, Citrix, bad move. I’m really disappointed. I passed 1Y0-351 in Nov 2017, and now, 12 months later, I have to book, pay, and pass 1Y0-340 if I not want to start with a CCA-N in Nov 2020. Bad move, Citrix, bad move!

Exam 1Y0-340 is titled as “Citrix NetScaler Advanced Topics: Security, Management, and Optimization”, where as 1Y0-351 was titeld as “Citrix NetScaler 10.5 Essentials and Networking”. You can assume that more in-depth knowledge is needed to pass the exam, as it was necessary for 1Y0-351. Note the “Advanced Topics” in the exam title.

But what are these “advanced topics”?  According to the exam prep guide, the perfect candidate for the 1Y0-340 exam can deploy and/or manage

  • Citrix NetScaler Application Firewall (AppFirewall) to secure application access in a Citrix NetScaler 12 environment, as well as
  • NetScaler Management and Analytics System (NMAS) to administer a Citrix NetScaler environment, or
  • Optimize NetScaler-managed application delivery traffic

Citrix NetScaler Application Firewall (AppFirewall)

You should take an in-depth look at these topics:

  • Application Firewall Overview
  • Application Firewall Profiles and Policies
  • Regular Expression
  • Attacks and Protections
  • Monitoring and Troubleshooting
  • Security and Filtering

NetScaler Management and Analytics System (NMAS)

  • NetScaler MAS: Introduction and Configuration
  • Managing and Monitoring NetScaler Instances
  • Managing NetScaler Configurations
  • NetScaler Web Logging

Optimize NetScaler-managed application delivery traffic

  • Integrated Caching
  • Front-End Optimization
  • Tuning and Optimizations

How to prep?

The exam prep guide referres to the NetScaler documentation, as also to training material. Unfortunately I don’t have access to the newer training material, only to the training material from my CNS-220 course. But hey: At least we have tons of publically available NetScaler 12.0 documentation available!

The exam prep guide has a section in which Citrix outlines sections, objectives and references. You will find links to the NetScaler 12.0 documentation, as well as knowledge base articles, or blog posts. Go through it. Read it carefully!

The exam prep guide also outlines the section titles and weights. Two areas stand out:

  • Section 4: Attacks and Protections, and
  • Section 8: Managing and Monitoring NetScaler Instances

The section weights are directly map to the number of questions in the exam. If the exam has 60 questions, and section 4 has a weight of 21%, at least 12 questions will relate to “Attacks and Protections”.

How did it go?

First things first: I passed with a good score. The exam had 62 questions and I needed at least 62% to pass the exam. I passed with 82%. As a non-native English speaker that took the exam in a country where english is a foreign language, I got 30 minutes extra, resulting in 120 minutes for 62 questions. Plenty of time…

What should I say? It was a multiple choice test. Read the questions carefully. The exam guide did not lie to me. It came pretty close to the topics that were described in the guide. For most questions, my first “educated guess” was right. Sometimes, the least dumb answer seemed to be correct. ;)

It was a bit frustrating that Citrix has changed product names. NetScaler is no “Application Delivery Controller”, MAS is now known as “Citrix Application Delivery Management”. There was a button which showed a mapping table “old name – new name”.

If you are experienced with Citrix ADC deployments and configuration, I think the exam prep guide is enough to pass the exam.

Good luck!

Exam prep & experience: VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Deployment Exam (VCAP6-DCV Deploy)

This posting is ~1 year years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

TL;DR: I have passed the VCAP6-DCV Deploy exam today. :) I want to thank Fred, Dominik, Frank and Jens-Henrik for kicking my ass. Without you, I would have taken the VCP 6.5 delta exam. Thank you!

As often, the whole thing started with a tweet. A tweet about my expiring VMware Certified Professional (VCP) certification.

To my surprise, several of my followers recommended to go for the VCAP6-DCV Deployment instead. Okay, so many smart people can’t be wrong.

I booked the exam, prepared for the exam, took the exam today – and passed!

27 questions in 205 minutes (25 minutes extension for non-native speaker) is a pretty challenging task. I was able to answer all questions in the given time. I left the test center with a good feeling, and after an hour I got the mail that I have passed the exam! Woohoo!

Preparation is everything

Preparation and time management. That’s all. Easier said than done. ;)

Make sure that you have read the exam guide. This document is intended to provide detailed information about the objectives covered by the exam. It was crucial for me to get a feeling about what I have to learn. I have been working with VMware vSphere since ESX 2.5, that’s a pretty long time, yet I do not know everything. Especially things like vSphere Data Protection, Auto Deploy or some certificate-related tasks are not day-to-day tasks.

I premillary worked with Kyle Jenners VCAP6-DCV Deployment Study Guide and and the VMware Hands-on-Lab. The VCAP6-DCV Deployment is not a MC test, like the VCP exams. You have to do real tasks. So experience is crucial to pass the exam.

Because I don’t have a lab, I used the VMware Hands-on Lab instead. I can recommend these three courses:

  • HOL-1911-01-SDC (What’s New in VMware vSphere 6.7)
  • HOL-1808-01-HCI (vSAN v6.6.1 – Getting Started), and
  • HOL-1827-01-HCI (VMware Storage – Virtual Volumes and Storage Policy Based Management)

Unfortunately, there is no course available that covers vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Replication.

But there was also another reason, why I have used the HOL: The VCAP exam environment is based on the interface of the VMware HOL. This was pretty helpful, because I was able to get in touch with the interface prior the exam.

Due to security restrictions, the exam environment does not support some keys and shortcuts, e.g. CRTL and ALT. To my surprise, the Backspace key worked in my enviornment. Many people stated, that the Backspace key isn’t working. Because of this, VMware has published an Interface Guide. Make sure to read it! And learn how to get around these limitations. There is also a pretty handy YouTube video with tips and tricks:

To test yourself, you can use this free VCAP-DCV simulator. The simulation provides scenarios that are equal to the scenarios from the exam. This is pretty handy to get a feeling of how good you are prepared for the exam.

VCAP6-DCV Deploy Exam Simulator – FREE

You have ~ 7 minutes per questions. If you don’t have an idea how to answer a question, move on! Write down the number and some keywords, then move onto the next question. Instead of waiting for tasks to finish, move onto the next question and come back later to check the task result.

I took the exam at Blue Consult in Krefeld (Germany). This was a recommendation of one of my followers (Thanks Dominik!). Fortunately, Blue Consult has keyboards with US layout in their test center, which makes it much easier for me. The performance of the exam environment was quite good. No lags or hanging sessions.

What’s next?

I will book the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Design exam as soon as I passed the NetScaler CCP-N exam, which I have to take until end of December 2018 (Thank you Citrix… NOT!).

VCIX6.5-DCV FTW! :)

HPE Networking expert level certifications

This posting is ~1 year years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

A couple of days ago, I took the HP0-Y47 exam “Deploying HP FlexNetwork Core Technologies”. It was one of two required exams to achive the HPE ASE – Data Center Network Integrator V1, and the HP ASE – FlexNetwork Integrator V1 certification. It was a long planned upgrade to my HP ATP certification, and it is a necessary certification for the HPE partner status of my employer.

You might find it confusing that I’m talking about an HP ASE and a HPE ASE. That is not a typo. The HP ASE was released prior the HP/ HPE split. The HPE ASE was released after the split in HP and HPE.

The HP/ HPE ATP is a professional level certification, comparable to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). The HP/ HPE ASE is an expert level certification, so the typical candidate for a HP/ HPE ASE certification is a professional with three to five years experience in designing and architecting complex enterprise-level networks.

Requirements

There are different ways to achieve this certification. Regardless of the way you chose, you need a certification from which you can upgrade. This does not have to be a HP/ HPE certification! If you hold a valid CCNA/ CCNP or JNCIP-ENT, you can upgrade from this certification without the need of a valid HP/ HPE ATP Networking certification.

If you want to earn the HPE ASE – Data Center Network Integrator V1, and the HP ASE – FlexNetwork Integrator V1 certification in a single step, you need at least one of these certifications:

  • HP ATP – FlexNetwork Solutions V3
  • HPE ATP – Data Center Solutions V1

Or if you want to upgrade from a non-HP/ HPE certification:

  • Cisco – CCNP (any CCNP regardless of technology)
  • Cisco – Certified Design Professional (CCDP)
  • Juniper – JNCIP-ENT

Now you need to pass two exams:

HP2-Z34 (Building HP FlexFabric Data Centers)

The HP2-Z34 exam focuses on deployment and implementation of HPE FlexFabric Data Center solutions. Therefore, the exams covers topics like

  • Multitenant Device Context (MDC)
  • Datacenter Bridging (DCB)
  • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
  • Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE)
  • Ethernet Virtual Interconnect (EVI),
  • Multi-Customer Edge (MCE),
  • Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL), and
  • Shortest Path Bridging Mac-in-Mac mode (SPBM).

HPE offers a study guide to prepare for this exam: Building HP FlexFabric Data Centers (HP2-Z34 and HP0-Y51). I used this guide to prepare for the exam (eBook). The guide was of an average quality. Its sufficient to prepare for the exam, but I used other materials to get a better understanding of some topics.

HP2 exams are web-based exams. To pass the HP2-Z34 exam, I had to answer 60 questions in 105 minutes, with a passing score of 70%. The exam was quite demanding, especially if you don’t have much real-world experience with some of the covered topics.

HP0-Y47 (Deploying HP FlexNetwork Core Technologies)

The HP0-Y47 exam covers the configuration, implementation, and the troubleshoot enterprise level HPE FlexNetwork solutions. The exam covers different topics, e.g.

  • Quality of Service (QoS)
  • redundancy (VRRP, Stacking)
  • multicast routing (IGMP, PIM)
  • dynamic routing (OSPF, BGP)
  • ACLs, and
  • port authentication/ port security (Mac-auth, Web-auth, 802.1x)

I used the HP ASE FlexNetwork Solutions Integrator (HP0-Y47) study guide to prepre myself for the exam. Unfortunately, it had the same average quality as the HP2 Z34 guide: Good enough to pass the exam, but don’t expect to much.

HP0-Y47 is a proctored exam. I had to answer 55 questions in 150 minutes, with a passing score of 65%. The exam is not very hard, if you were familiar with the covered topics. Experience with ProVision and Comware is absolutely necessary, because both platforms have their peculiarities, e.g. processing of ACLs, differences in Stacking technologies, commands, STP support etc.

It took me some time to prepare for both exams, despite the fact that I work with ProVision and Comware Switches every day. So I’m pretty happy that I passed both exams on the first try.

Citrix Certified Professional – Networking (CCP-N) exam experience

This posting is ~2 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

Last friday I passed the 1Y0-351 (Citrix NetScaler 10.5 Essentails and Networking) exam with a pretty good score. The exam was necessary, not only because I will do much more NetScaler projects in the future, but also because Citrix has made it mandatory to have a CCP-N in your company to to sell Citrix NetScaler.

Preparation

My employer booked me a 5-day course (CNS-220 Citrix NetScaler Essentials and Traffic Management). Very nice, although I already had experience with NetScaler deployments. This training was designed for NetScaler 12.0, not for 10.5.

A training might be recommended to prepare for an exam, but usually it is not sufficient to pass it. But I want to pass the exam in the first try, so I took a closer look into the Citrix NetScaler 10.5 Essentials and Networking Preparation Guide.

In addition to the student and lab material, I deployed three NetScaler VPX (10.5,11.1 and 12.0) in my lab. I really recommend this! Especially to learn the CLI and how to read the log files.

The exam

S. Hofschlaeger / pixelio.de

The exam 1Y0-351 is focused on NetScaler 10.5, and will be not available after January 19, 2018. The sucessor of this exam is 1Y0-340, which is based on NetScaler 12.0. It is available since October 20, 2017. You might have noticed that my course was designed for 12.0, but I took the 10.5 exam. Well, I could not identify a question that would have had to be answered differently for NetScaler 12.0. But I really recommend to take the exam matching your course.

You have to answer 72 questions in 120 minutes. I got 30 minutes extra, because I’m a non-native english speaker. I had to answer two survey before the exam. One of them was a self-assessment about my NetScaler skills.

The questions were pretty fair, no trick questions, or questions were multiple answers seemed to be correct. The exam met the exam objectives from the prep guide. And because I already wrote it: You really should work with the CLI, and you really should know the important logs.

In sum: A challenging, but pretty fair exam. No marketing, no factual knowledge from spec sheets etc. When you are quite familiar with NetScalers, there is a good chance to pass the exam in the first attempt.

VCP7-DTM certification beta exam experience

This posting is ~3 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

Nearly a month ago, a tweet caught my attention:

These beta exams are a cost-effective way to achieve certifications. The last beta exam I took, was the VCP6-DCV beta. Because I already had the VCP6-DTM on my to-do list, the new VCP7-DTM beta exam was released just in the right moment.

As already mentioned in the blog post of the VMware Education and Certification Blog, there are primarly three reasons to take this beta exam:

  • get certified
  • low costs (only 50 USD)
  • identify strengths and weaknesses

Beside of this, VMware can test the questions and is getting feedback to increase the quality of their exams.

Exam preparation

The beta exam preparation guide is quite comprehensive.  Desktop and Mobility (DTM) is not only about VMWare Horizon View. VMware Horizon Mirage, App Volumes, User Environment Manager, Thin App, IDM/ Workspace are also part of the exam.

Section 1 – Install and Configure Horizon Server Components

  • Objective 1.1 – Describe techniques to prepare environment for Horizon
  • Objective 1.2 Determine procedures to install Horizon Components
  • Objective 1.3 – Determine steps to configure Horizon Components
  • Objective 1.4 – Analyze End User Requirements for Display Protocol Performance Knowledge
  • Objective 1.5 – Diagnose and solve issues related to connectivity between Horizon Server Components

Section 2 – Create and Configure Pools

  • Objective 2.1 – Configure and Manage Horizon Pools
  • Objective 2.2 – Build and Customize RDSH Server and Desktop Images

Section 3 – Configure and Administer VMware Mirage

  • Objective 3.1 – Install and Configure Mirage Components
  • Objective 3.2 – Configure and Manage Mirage layers
  • Objective 3.3 – Configure and Manage Mirage Endpoints

Section 4 – Configure and Manage Identity Manager

  • Objective 4.1 – Install and Configure VMware Identity Manager
  • Objective 4.2 – Manage VMware Identity Manager

Section 5 – Configure and Manage User Environment Manager

  • Objective 5.1 – Install and Configure VMware User Environment Manager
  • Objective 5.2 – Manage VMware User Environment Manager

Section 6 – Configure and Manager App Volumes

  • Objective 6.1 – Install and Configure VMware App Volumes
  • Objective 6.2 – Manage VMware AppStacks and writeable Volumes

Section 7 – Configure vRealize Operations for Horizon

  • Objective 7.1 – Manage VMware Workspace Portal

The preparation guide outlines some documents, which can be used to preapre for the exam. Although I’m working with Horizon View on a regular base, I had some “blind spots”. I used the official documentation and my lab to prepare for the exam.

The exam

The exam contained 175 questions, and I had 245 minutes to answer all the questions. I arrived early at the test center, because I had booked the first available slot for that day. I did not expect to be able to answer all the questions. View, Mirage, App Volumes, Workspace and IDM were the main topics, only a few questions about ThinApp and vROps for Horizon. Many questions were about administrative topics, where to click to achieve something, or where a specific option is located. There were also some questions about requirements, supported databases etc. As far as I can judge, these were all fair questions. If you have intensivly studied the documentation, you have do not have to fear this exam. Experience in administration is a great plus.

I really do not know if I have passed it. It will take some time. The results will be available after the beta phase. If I don not passed, I have at least gained experience.