Tag Archives: storeonce

Protection of virtual machines with HP StoreOnce VSA & Veeam Backup & Replication v7

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

HP StoreOnce Appliances or VSA offers three different types of backup destinations:

  • Virtual Tape Library (VTL)
  • NAS (CIFS or NFS)
  • StoreOnce Catalyst

If you use Veeam Backup & Replication, the NAS feature is possibly worth a try. Using the NAS feature, the StoreOnce appliance or VSA offers a CIFS or NFS share, which can be used as a backup destionation. Today I want to show you how you can use a NAS share of a StoreOnce VSA with Veeam Backup & Replication.To backup virtual maschines with Veeam Backup & Replication to a HP StoreOnce VSA you need at least three things:

  • a HP StoreOnce VSA
  • a backup server with Veeam Backup & Replication
  • at least one VM

I have built such an environment in my lab. I described the process how to get and deploy StoreOnceVSA in this article. I will not cover the installation of Veeam Backup & Replication, because this is really easy. This article only covers the configuration of the StoreOnce VSA in terms of the backup of VMs, the configuration of a Veeam backup job as well as some backup tests.

Configure StoreOnce VSA

The first step is the configuration of a NAS share. To do so, login into the StoreOnce Management Console. If you haven’t changed the default login credentials, you can login with:

Username: Admin
Password: admin

Click on “NAS” and then on “Shares”. Click “Create” on the upper-right.

storeonce_create_cifs_share_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Name your CIFS share. Click on “Create”. If you like you can enable authentication, so that you must provide a username and password to access the share. You can enable this option under “NAS”. By this the configuration of the StoreOnce VSA has finished.

storeonce_create_cifs_share_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Configure Veeam Repository

First we need to add a new backup repository. Name the repository and click “Next”.

veeam_config_repo_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The repository type is “Shared folder”. Click “Next”.

veeam_config_repo_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Enter the UNC path to the StoreOnce VSA share. If you have configured authentication, you need to provide credentials in ordner to access the share. Depending on your environment, you can use the IP or the FQDN.

veeam_config_repo_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Click on “Advanced” lower-right.

veeam_config_repo_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Compression reduces the efficiency of deduplication. So enable the checkbox “Decompress backup data bl ocks before storing”. This ensures that the data blocks are decompressed before written to the StoreOnce VSA.

veeam_config_repo_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

I have disabled the vPower NFS. Depending on your needs you can leave this option enabled.

veeam_config_repo_6

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Check the made settings and click “Next”.

veeam_config_repo_7

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Congratulations. You now have a CIFS repository which points to your StoreOnce VSA.

veeam_config_repo_8

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Configure a backup job

Now it’s time to create a backup job. Create a new job and give it a name. Click “Next”.

veeam_config_job_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Add the backup objects. This can be for example a cluster, a host, vApps or one or more VMs.

veeam_config_job_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Select your newly created repository. Click on “Advanced”.

veeam_config_job_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

It’s recommended to use the “Incremental” backup mode when using backup appliances like HP StoreOnce or EMC Data Domain. This backup mode has a lower performance impact on the backup appliance, but it needs more disk space, because of regular full backups. This backup mode starts with a full backup and makes subsequently incremental backups, until a new full backup is created. Because the backup appliance does deduplication, additional disk space due to regular full backups doesn’t use much additional disk space.

veeam_config_job_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Switch to the “Storage” tab. It’s a good idea to use deduplication on the backup proxy and the backup appliance. But the deduplication should be optmized for “Local target”. Veeam uses then a block size of 1 MB. Compression should be disabled to optimizes the deduplication ratio. This will result into a higher network load!

veeam_config_job_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Switch to the “vSphere” tab and enable the checkbox “Enable VMware Tools quiescence”. Please note, that this does not support log truncation for applications like Exchange or SQL Server! Click “OK”, then “Next”.

veeam_config_job_6

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

If you want to backup applications like Exchange or SQL Server, tick the “Enable application-aware image processing” checkbox. Click “Next”.

veeam_config_job_7

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Configure the job scheduling depending on your needs. Click “Create”

veeam_config_job_8

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Check the summary and then click “Finish”.

veeam_config_job_9

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The job is now ready to run, either by starting the job manually or wait until the scheduled job starts.

Backup tests

I’ve done some tests. During the first full backup, Veeam Backup & Replication processed 17 GB and transferred 10 GB.

veeam_job_result_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The StoreOnce VSA wrote 7,4 GB to disk.

veeam_job_result_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

A second full backup showed similar results as the first full backup

veeam_job_result_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

But only additional 0,2 GB were written to disk, and the deduplication ratio raised from 2.4 to 4,7.

veeam_job_result_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

You can access the CIFS share using the Windows Explorer. You can see, that the stored files doesn’t differ from a “normal” CIFS repository.

veeam_job_result_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Final words

Using a HP StoreOnce VSA as CIFS repository for Veeam Backup & Replication is really easy and doesn’t need much configuration. But some points should be considered. The settings that I have used are recommended for maximizing the backup capacity and retention time. If you focus on RTO, you should consider backing up critical VMs to a physical backup proxy with local disks (or access to a fast storage system) in addition to a backup to a StoreOnce appliance or VSA. The backup and restore performance depends on the backup target (StoreOnce VSA) and the backup proxy (in my case a VM). Depending on your environment and the number of backup proxies, backup targets and repositories you have to make additional decisions.

Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part III

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

In part I of this series I showed you the download and the deployment of the HP StoreOnce VSA. Part II showed you the configuration of two libraries and the connection of the backup server to this two tape libraries. Part III of this series covers the configuration of devices and meda pools in HP Data Protector 8.1. This article will not show the installation of HP Data Protector 8.1.

Device configuration

The first step is to configure the devices. Select “Devices & Media” from the drop-down menu and right-click “Devices”. Select “Autoconfigure Devices…”.

configure_storeonce_dp_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The wizard shows all clients of the cell, that have a media agent (MA) installed. In my example only the backup server has a MA installed. Enable the checkbox and click “Next”.

configure_storeonce_dp_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Data Protector now discovers the devices, that are attached to the server with the MA. There are two different views: “Group by Devices” shows the devices on top and the MA, that can use the device, as leafs. “Group by Hosts” likewise, but starting point is the host, not the device. I unchecked “Automatically configure MultiPath devices”, because the libraries are only attached to one host. Theoretically you can connect the library to more than one host (device sharing). Click “Finish”.

configure_storeonce_dp_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Now you have two tape libraries. The naming is confusing, so check the SCSI ID in the device properties and the iSCSI initiator. Usually the first presented library is the first device on the SCSI bus. It might be useful to enable the checkbox “Automatically discover changed SCSI address”.

configure_storeonce_dp_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Switch to the “General” tab and rename the library. You also have to enable the “Virtual Tape Library” checkbox. This checkbox tells Data Protector, that this device is part of a VTL and it’s licensed by capacity. If you license the usable capacity of a StoreOnce appliance or VSA with Data Protector “Advanced Backup to Disk” licenses, you can create as much devices as the StoreOnce appliance or VSA support. You don’t have to license drives! This is a huge benefit, because you can create a library for each server. This ensures LAN-free backup and optimal deduplication results.

configure_storeonce_dp_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Rename the drives.

configure_storeonce_dp_6

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Switch to the “Settings” tab and click “Advanced”.

configure_storeonce_dp_7

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Set the “Concurrency” to 1. This ensures that only one data stream can write to the device. This disables multiplexing! But because you can create multiple libraries with multiple drives, you can use multistreaming. In this case each Disk Agent (DA) writes to a single device and a single (virtual) tape media.

configure_storeonce_dp_8

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Switch to the “Sizes” tab and set the block size from 256 kB to 512 kB. This provides the best deduplication and performance balance. Click “OK”.

configure_storeonce_dp_9

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Enable the two checkboxes in the “Device Policy” section. Click “Apply”.

configure_storeonce_dp_10

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Because we changed the block size to 512 kB, we need to adjust the “MaxTransferLength” value of the iSCSI initiator.

configure_storeonce_dp_11

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Change the “MaxTransferLength” from 40000 to 80000. 0x40000 is 262144 in decimal. So you need to double the value.

configure_storeonce_dp_12

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The device configuration is finished. Now we need to configure the media pools.

Media pool configuration

Each library need their own tape media pool. In the “Devices & Media” section right-click the “Add Media Pool…” und “Media > Pools”.

configure_storeonce_dp_13

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Enter a name and select the appropiate media type.

configure_storeonce_dp_14

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Make sure, that the media in this pool are not ppendable! This is especially then useful, if you use the replication feature between StoreOnce appliances or VSA. For best effort, set the pool to “Non Appendable”. Leave the other options untouched.

configure_storeonce_dp_15

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Click “Finish”.

configure_storeonce_dp_16

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

You will notice, that the media in the library are marked with a questionmark. Don’t format the tapes! Proceed with the next step.

configure_storeonce_dp_17

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Open a Windows Explorer and navigate to C:\ProgramData\OmniBack\Config\Server\Options. Make a backup of the “global” file. Open the file and search for “InitOnLoosePolicy”. Set this value to 1. Save the file and restart the Server. This restart is also necessary, because of the registry change we made earlier. This setting makes it possible, that Data Protector can format media as needed. Usually Data Protector will reuse media after the data on the tape has expired. The “InitOnLoosePolicy” option in combination with a library, that has enough slots (you can’t vault media in a VTL…) and non appendable pools ensures, that the minimal possible number of tapes is used and that the StoreOnce housekeeping makes a good job.

configure_storeonce_dp_20

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Right-click “Slots” on the library and start a “Barcode Scan”.

configure_storeonce_dp_18

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

After the rescan, Data Protector will show a barcode label for each tape. Each tape is detected as “Blank”. Please remember: Don’t format the tapes!

configure_storeonce_dp_19

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Moment of truth

Now it’s time to test our backup with a job. I created a simple job, that makes a filesystem backup of my backup server. I use only one drive, because the server has only a single disk.

configure_storeonce_dp_21

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Select the drive(s), that should be used for the job and make sure, that the job uses the correct media pool.

configure_storeonce_dp_22

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

To make a long story short: I ran multiple full backups to the library and got a dedup ratio of 7:1. Depending on the type of data and the number of backups the value can be lower or higher.

configure_storeonce_dp_23

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Final words

This is only a very simple example for a solution based on HP StoreOnce VSA and HP Data Protector. I hope I could show you some key points that have to be observed. If you use a StoreOnce appliance or VSA, you have to align your backup concept to this. Otherwise you may not get the expected results. I would like to recommend these three articles, which were published on the HP Technical Support Services Blog:

DPTIPS: Multiplexing, Multistreaming, Multi … What?
DPTIPS: Device Block Size Challenges
DPTIPS: 1 way to ensure uninspired StoreOnce VTL performance and 7 ways not to

Some of my thoughts are based on these articles.

Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part II

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

In part I of this series I showed you the download and the deployment of the HP StoreOnce VSA. But without further configuration, it’s only a VM that has 4 vCPUs, 16 GB memory and ~ 1,5 TB of disk space. Pretty much for a VM that can’t do anything for you. ;)

Creating a library

Open a browser and open the StoreOnce Management Console.

Username: Admin
Password: admin

configure_storeonce_vsa_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

First of all I recommend to disable the “Auto Create” option. If you leave this option enabled, a VTL will automatically created when an iSCSI initiator connects to the StoreOnce VSA. Click on “VTL” in the navigator pane, click “Edit”, uncheck the box and click “Update”.

configure_storeonce_vsa_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Click on “Libraries” and then click “Create” on the upper right.

configure_storeonce_vsa_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Enter a name for the new library. You can choose between different emulation types. I selected a MSL2024 with two LTO-5 drives. The iSCSI initiator name is the IQN of my Data Protector backup server. Enter the IQN of the server, which should connect to the VTL. Some words to the “right” design: I recommend to create a library for each type of data, e.g. a library for Exchange, one for fileservices, one for SQL etc. This ensures better dedup results.

configure_storeonce_vsa_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

I also created a second library for Exchange backups.

configure_storeonce_vsa_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Now it’s time to connect the libraries to our backup server. I used the iSCSI initiator from Microsoft, which is included in Windows Server 2008 R2. Enter the ip address of the StoreOnce VSA and click “Quick Connect…”

configure_storeonce_vsa_7

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Select each entry and lick “Connect”.

configure_storeonce_vsa_8

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

No you should see the devices in the Windows Device Manager. If you have two libraries with two drives, you should see six entries: Two media changer and four drives.

configure_storeonce_vsa_9

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

At this point is the configuration of the StoreOnce VSA finished. The next part covers the configuration of the libraries and media pools in HP Data Protector 8.1.

Feel free to leave a comment if you have further questions or notes.

Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part I

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

The HP StoreOnce VSA is a virtual storage appliance, that is designed for backups between 1 TB and 10 TB and it’s based on HPs StoreOnce technology. I wrote a short overview about the HP StoreOnce VSA some weeks ago. Take a look at this blog posting if you are not familiar with HP StoreOnce VSA. This article is focuses on the deployment of the HP StoreOnce VSA in a VMware vSphere environment. A second and third blog post covers the configuration of the HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector.

Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part I
Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part II
Deploying HP StoreOnce VSA with HP Data Protector – Part III

Get the software

HP offers a 60-day free trial license for the HP StoreOnce VSA and HP StoreVirtual VSA. Just follow this link. You need a HP Passport account to download the software. When you follow the link, you will get to the download page. Click “Receive for Free”.

storeonce_vsa_deployment_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Now you need to login with your HP Passport account. If you have no account, please create an account.

storeonce_vsa_deployment_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Acknowledge, that you have read the accept the software and license termins for this order. Click “Next”.

storeonce_vsa_deployment_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

You need to download two files: One ISO with th StoreOnce VSA and the HP StoreOnce Enterprise Manager. You can choose between the standard, browser-based download, and the HP Download Manager. I usually choose the browser-based download.

storeonce_vsa_deployment_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

This is the second file you need to download. You can download both files at the same time. You don’t have to wait until the first download has finished. After the first download has started, simply click the second file and click “Download”.

storeonce_vsa_deployment_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Proceed further after the downloads are finished.

Deploy the StoreOnce VSA

There are two ways to deploy a StoreOnce VSA:

  • using the OVF
  • using StoreOnce Enterprise Manager (SEM)

I will show you the way using the OVF. The cause for this is the behaviour of the SEM, that checks the required space before the deployment. If there is not enough space in the datastore, SEM will refuse the deployment. Deploying an OVF isn’t a big deal. I used the vSphere Client (not the Web Client).

Start the wizard and browse to the OVF. Click “Next”.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Click “Next”.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Enter a name for the VM and select the datacenter.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_3

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Select the cluster, into which the VSA should be deployed.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_4

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Because I use vApps, I selected the vApp used for my backup tests. If you use resource pools, select the desired resource pool.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_5

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Select the datastore for the StoreOnce VSA. Please note, that the VSA will use ~ 500 GB when thick provisioned.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_6

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Due to the space requirements, I decided to use thin-provisioned disks.

I got an email from Anshul Nagor (StoreOnce/ Storage R&D Lab, HP Bangalore). Anshul wrote that HP recommends to use thin-provisioning for the system disk. The system disk holds the OS and the software. No data will be written to it. The next release of the VSA will have a smaller system disk.
deploy_storeonce_vsa_7

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

I have a dedicated port group for iSCSI. My backup server has also a NIC attached to this port group.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_8

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Check the summary and start the deployment. Don’t power on the VM!

deploy_storeonce_vsa_9

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

The VSA needs an additional disk for the data. The disk must have at least a capacity of 1 TB. Otherwise the instant-on licence is not applied and the StoreOnce services will not start. Due to the space requirements, I decided to use thin-provisioned disks. This is not recommended for production use.

I’d like to thank Anshul Nagori, Patrick Osborne and Calvin Zito for helping to solve a problem, that only existed because I didn’t had read carefully enough.
deploy_storeonce_vsa_10

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Now you can power on the VSA. The VSA will run a couple of scripts. When you see the message “Services are up – activating the instant-on license” everything’s fine.

deploy_storeonce_vsa_11

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

If you have DHCP available, the VSA will try to get a IP via DHCP. If you don’t have a DHCP server available, you can use “net set wizard” to start the network configuration wizard.

Username: Admin
Password: admin

deploy_storeonce_vsa_12

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

I captured the output of the wizard:

At the end the network configuration is applied and you should see this message:

deploy_storeonce_vsa_13

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

Now you should be able to access the web interface of the VSA. Use a browser and try to access https://<ip address>. Congratulations! Now you have 60 days to play with your brand new HP StoreOnce VSA. Part II of this series covers the configuration of the VSA. Part III covers the steps to use the StoreOnce VSA in combination with HP Data Protector 8.1.

Feel free to leave a comment if you have further questions or notes.

HP StoreOnce VSA – An introduction

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

A side effect of data growth is the growth of the amount of data that must be backed up. The path of least resistance is buying more disks and/ or tapes. Another possible solution is data deplucation. With data deduplication you can’t reduce the amount of data that must be backed up, but you can reduce the amount of data that must be stored. HP StoreOnce Backup is HPs solution to address this problem.

HP StoreOnce Backup is a software-based solution. It’s included in hardware appliances and in HP Data Protector (as part of the Advanced Backup-to-Disk option). But you can buy it also as a Virtual Store Appliance. This the HP StoreOnce VSA. This article will focus on the HP StoreOnce VSA.

Delivery format & requirements

The HP StoreOnce VSA is delivered as VMware virtual appliance (OVF format). You can start with 1 TB of usable capacity and you can increment this capacity in 1 TB steps up to 10 TB. The capacity is provides in form of thick provisioned 1 TB VMDKs. Raw devices are not supported. You can use a NFS datastore if you like. Because the HP StoreOnce VSA is a VM, it allocates processor, memory, storage and networking resources from the hypervisor. To ensure sufficient performance, it’s recommended to meet some requirements.

CapacityRAIDRAMCPUNetworking
1 to 5 TBmin. 3 disks as RAID 5min. 16 GBmin. 4 vCPUsmin. 2x 1 GbE
6 to 10 TBmin. 3 disks as RAID 5min. 32 GBmin. 4 vCPUsmin. 2x 1 GbE

Yes, the StoreOnce VSA is not a tiny, resource-saving VM. But because it’s a VM, it can benefit from several VMware features, like VMware HA, vMotion or SRM. For customers with AMD hosts the Quick Specs contain a interesting need:

If the VMware host has AMD CPUs some configuration is needed to run the StoreOnce VSA. It is necessary to create a single host cluster witht the EVC (Enhanced vMotion Compatibiity) mode set to AMD generation 3 or earlier.

Licensing

The license provides by HP is a three-year license, so it has to be renewed after three years. The license includes the whole capacity, so there is no need to aquire additional liceses. The license also includes replication functionality and StoreOnce Catalyst. The downside is: When you need to backup ony 1 TB, you need to purchase a 10 TB license.

Connectivity

HP StoreOnce VSA can be configured in ethernet environments with StoreOnce Catalyst, VTL and as NAS (CIFS) backup targets. Fibre-Channel isn’t supported. If you want to use StoreOnce with Fibre-Channel, you have to use a harwdare-based StoreOnce appliance. You can also use it as a replication target (max. 1 source appliance). HP StoreOnce Catalyst allows you to transfer deduplicated data between StoreOnce devices without the need of rehydrate the data. All devices use the same dedulication algorithm. So StoreOnce Catalyst allows you to deduplicate data on a application server and then transfer it (still deduplicated) to a remote StoreOnce device.

Management

HP StoreOnce Enterprise Manager (SEM) is a centralized management solution for physical and virtual StoreOnce devices. It can manage up to 400 physical and virtual StoreOnce devices across multiple sites. It provides monitoring, reporting and it integrates with the StoreOnce GUI for single pane-of-glass management. You can also deploy StoreOnce VSA through SEM.

Try it!

HP offers a 60 day evaluation. Simply download and try it. If you enter a valid license key during the trial period, you can continue using it without the need of a reinstallation.