Tag Archives: virtualilization

VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Design Exam (VCAP-DCV Design 2021)

In August 2018 I’ve passed the VCAP6-DCV Deployment exam. After a busy first half of 2019 it’s time to start preparing the VMware Certified Advanced Professional — Data Center Virtualization Design 2019 exam. But I lost focus and in 2020 I had a lot to do – but not VMW related and so I also missed my goal to take the VCAP-DCV Design exam.

I have to push myself, so I decided to re-cap my half finished blog series to get myself back on track.

There are many great study guides out there, but in most cases I need “my own study guide” to feel well prepared. I hope this blog series will keep me on track, and I stay focused. This is my third try to prepare for this exam… :/

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

In opposite to the Deploy exam, the Design exam is a MC exam. 130 Minutes for 60 questions. Sounds easy, but it’s told that it’s one of the hardest exams available by VMware.

The exam consists of three sections:

  • Section 1 – Create a vSphere 6.5 Conceptual Design
  • Section 2 – Create a vSphere 6.x Logical Design from an Existing Conceptual Design
  • Section 3 – Create a vSphere 6.x Physical Design from an Existing Logical Design

Each section contains several objects.

  • Objective 3.1 – Transition from a logical design to a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.2 – Create a vSphere 6.x physical network design from an existing logical design
  • Objective 3.3 – Create a vSphere 6.x physical storage design from an existing logical design
  • Objective 3.4 – Determine appropriate computer resources for a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.5 – Determine virtual machine configuration for a vSphere 6.x physical design
  • Objective 3.6 – Determine data center management options for a vSphere 6.x physical design

I will try to cover each objective in a blog post and add a link here. Feel free to add comments, corrections and questions. :) The already added links link to already written blog posts, but I will revise the alreay posted blog posts.

Leave a comment if you have questsions. :)

Replacing an expired lookup service SSL certificate on a vSphere PSC

This posting is ~5 years years old. You should keep this in mind. IT is a short living business. This information might be outdated.

A few days ago, I ran into a very nasty problem. Fortunately, it was in my lab. Some months ago, I replaced the certificates of my vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA), and I’ve chosen to use the VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA) as a subordinate of my AD-based enterprise CA. The VMCA was used as intermediate CA. The certificates were replaced using the  vSphere 6.0 Certificate Manager (/usr/lib/vmware-vmca/bin/certificate-manager), and I followed the instructions of KB2112016 (Configuring VMware vSphere 6.0 VMware Certificate Authority as a subordinate Certificate Authority).

The VCSA was migrated from vSphere 5.5, and with vSphere 5.5 I was also using custom certificates. These certificates were also issued by my AD-based enterprise CA, and these certificates were migration during the vSphere 5.5 > 6.0 migration. So at the end, I replaced custom certificates with VMCA (as an intermediate CA) certificates.

Everything was fine, until a power outage. After powering-on my VMs, I noticed several errors. After logging into the vSphere Web Client, I got an error message at the top of the page:

Error occurred while processing request. Check vSphere WebClient logs for details.

While searching for the cause, I checked the URL of the Platform Services Controller (https://vcsa1.lab.local/psc/login) and got this:

psc_error_1

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

HTTP Status 400 - An error occurred while sending an authentication request to the PSC Single Sign-On server - null

type Status report
message An error occurred while sending an authentication request to the PSC Single Sign-On server - null
description The request sent by the client was syntactically incorrect.

This error led me to KB2144086 (Updating certificates using certificate manager on vCenter Server or PSC 6.0 Update 1b fails), but was able to proof, that I have used different subject names for the different solution user certificates.

While digging in the PSC logs, I found this error in the /var/log/vmware/psc-client/psc-client.log:

Caused by: com.vmware.vim.vmomi.client.exception.VlsiCertificateException: Server certificate chain is not trusted and thumbprint doesn't match
        at com.vmware.vim.vmomi.client.http.impl.ThumbprintTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(ThumbprintTrustManager.java:217)
        at sun.security.ssl.AbstractTrustManagerWrapper.checkServerTrusted(Unknown Source)

        ... 71 more

Finally, I found Aaron Smiths blog post “Troubleshooting Expired PSC Certificates with vSphere 6“, who had the same problem. I checked the certificate of the Lookup Service and there it was:

psc_error_2

Patrick Terlisten/ www.vcloudnine.de/ Creative Commons CC0

This was the original custom certificate, issued by my AD-based enterprise CA, and installed on my vSphere 5.5 VCSA.

Aaron also offered the solution by referencing KB2118939 (Replacing the Lookup Service SSL certificate on a Platform Services Controller 6.0). I followed the instructions in KB2118939 and replaced the certificate of the Lookup Service with a certificate of the VMCA.

Take care of your certificates

With vSphere 6.0, the Lookup Service should be accessed through the HTTP Reverse Proxy. This proxy uses the machine certificate. Therefore, an expired Lookup Certificate is not obvious. If you connect directly to the Lookup Service using port 7444, you will see the expired certificate. The Lookup Service certificate is not replaced with a custom certificate, if you replace the different solution user certificates.

If you have a vSphere 6.0 VCSA, which was migrated from vSphere 5.5, and you have replaced the certificates on that vSphere 5.5 VCSA with custom certificates, you should check your Lookup Service certificate immidiately! Follow KB2118939 for further instructions.

Credit to Aaron Smith for this blog post. Thank you!