Disable Outlook cached mode for shared mailboxes

When you use Microsoft Outlook in cached mode, what I always recommend, and you add additional mailboxes to your outlook profile, you will notice that the OST file will grow. Outlook will download the mailbox items (mails, calendar entries, contacts etc.), and store them in the OST file. This is the default behaviour since Microsoft Outlook 2010. If you want to disable this behaviour, you have two options:

  • Edit the registry
  • Use a group policy object (GPO)

Edit the Windows registry

The easiest way is to use a reg file. Copy this text into a file and save it as disablecachedmode.reg. Then double click the file and confirm, that you want to import the registry file.

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Disable Outlook cached mode for shared mailboxes
5 (100%) 7 votes

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Changes to supported .NET Frameworks for Exchange 2013/2016

EDIT: If you have already installed .NET 4.6.1, check this blog post on how to remove it (You Had Me At EHLO…)

Microsoft Exchange heavily relies on Microsoft .NET Framework. Because of this, Microsoft provides a matrix for the supported Microsoft .NET Frameworks. Mostly unknown is the fact, that Exchange doesn’t support the every Microsoft .NET Framework, and this is causing trouble sometimes. Some admins simply install the latest .NET releases because “it doesn’t hurt”. Well… it hurts!

Changes for .NET Framework 4.6.1

Microsoft has changed the support policy for .NET Framework 4.6.1 with the release of Exchange 2013 CU13 and Exchange 2016 CU2. Up to this versions, only .NET Framework 4.5.2 is supported. Starting with Exchange 2013 CU13 and Exchange 2016 CU2, Microsoft supports .NET Framework 4.6.1 together with a hotfix rollup (KB3146715 for Server 2012 R2, KB3146714 for Server 2012 and KB3146716 for Server 2008 R2). If you wish to install .NET Framework 4.6.1, make sure to install Exchange 2013 CU13 or 2016 CU2 first.

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Changes to supported .NET Frameworks for Exchange 2013/2016
5 (100%) 7 votes

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Receive Connector role not selectable in Exchange 2016 CU2

Another bug in Exchange 2016 CU2. The Role of a new receive connector is greyed out. You can select “Front-End-Transport”. This is a screenshot from a german Exchange 2016 CU2.

receive_connect_role_not_selectable

Solution

Use the Exchange Management Shell to create a new receive connector. Afterwards, you can modify it with the Exchange Control Panel (ECP).

Microsoft has confirmed, that this is a bug in Exchange 2016 CU2.

Receive Connector role not selectable in Exchange 2016 CU2
5 (100%) 12 votes

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Exchange 2013 Offline Address Book visible after Exchange 2016 deployment?!

After deploying a new Microsoft Exchange organization with Exchange 2016, or after deploying a Microsoft Exchange 2016 into an existing organization, you might notice a strange behaviour regarding the Offline Address Books (OAB).

Huh?! Where does this Exchange 2013 OAB come from? As you can see in the cmdlet output, there’s no Exchange 2013 in this organization.

There is no Exchange 2013 server in this organization. Only Exchange 2010 (Build 14.3) and 2016 (Build 15.1).

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Exchange 2013 Offline Address Book visible after Exchange 2016 deployment?!
5 (100%) 5 votes

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Setting up split DNS using Windows DNS server

Sometimes it’s necessary to have two DNS servers that are authoritative for the same DNS namespace. This is the case if you use the same namespace for your web site and your internal Active Directory domain, e.g. terlisten-consulting.de. Or that you have created the zone terlisten-consulting.de in your Windows DNS to point specific hosts to internal IP addresses. The DNS servers at your ISP would be authoritative, and the domain controllers of your Active Directory would also be authoritative for the same domain. The response to a query depends on which DNS server you ask. So what would happen if you try to resolve www.terlisten-consulting.de, and the internal DNS has no record for it?

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Setting up split DNS using Windows DNS server
5 (100%) 9 votes

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Monitoring hardware status with Python and vSphere API calls

Apparently it’s “how to monitor hardware status” week on vcloudnine.de. Some days ago, I wrote an article about using SNMP for hardware monitoring. You can also use the vSphere Web Client to get the status of the host hardware. A third way is through the vSphere API. I just want to share a short example how to use vSphere API calls and pyVmomi. pyVmomi is the Python SDK for the VMware vSphere API.

Get hardware status with vSphere API calls

I just want to share a small example, that shows the basic principle. The script gathers the temperature sensor data of a ProLiant DL360 G7 running ESXi 6.0 U2 using vSphere API calls.

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Monitoring hardware status with Python and vSphere API calls
4.5 (90%) 6 votes

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Missing hardware status tab in the vSphere Client

I thought, everyone knows it, but I’m always being asked “Where’s the hardware status tab?” after an update from vSphere 5.x to 6. Many customers still use the vSphere Client (C # client), and steer clear of the vSphere Web Client. To be honest: Me too. I often use the C# client, especially if I do mass operations, or for a quick look at something.

This is really nothing new, the answer is clear. But I think it’s a good idea to write it down. At least for myself. As a reminder to use the vSphere Web Client.

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Missing hardware status tab in the vSphere Client
4.5 (90%) 8 votes

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How to monitor ESXi host hardware with SNMP

The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a protocol for monitoring and configuration of network-attached devices. SNMP exposes data in the form of variables and values. These variables can then be queried or set. A query retrieves the value of a variable, a set operation assigns a value to a variable. The variables are organized in a hierarchy and each variable is identified by an object identifiers (OID). The management information base (MIB ) describes this hierarchy. MIB files (simple text files) contain metadata for each OID. These are necessary for the translation of a numeric OID into a human-readable format.  SNMP knows two devices types:

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How to monitor ESXi host hardware with SNMP
4.38 (87.5%) 8 votes

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Why VARs should rethink their business model

Okay, the headline of this blog post is a bit provocative. This blog post is not written from the vendor perspective. It’s the perspective of someone, who’s sitting between the vendor and the customer. A value-added reseller (VAR) is typically located between vendor and customer. And the business model of a VAR is typically based on selling hardware, software and service.

Added value

The typical customer doesn’t have the time, money and the know-how to transform business requirements into a bill of materials (BOM). It’s a “make-or-buy” decision. And “buy” is often better than “make”. The customer needs a partner who helps him to transform the business requirements into a solution and a BOM.

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Why VARs should rethink their business model
4.25 (85%) 8 votes

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Python 2.7 for CentOS 6

By default, CentOS 6 comes with Python 2.6. This is a bit outdated, especially if you take into account, that Python 2.7.11, which is the latest Python 2 release, was released in December 2015. If you are new to Pyhton, you will usually start with Python 3. Currently, Python 3.5.1 is the latest Python 3 release. So, Python 2.6 is REALLY old.

Okay, I could use another distro. Ehm… no. CentOS is the is the open-source version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It was, and it is, designed to be similar to RHEL. CentOS runs only the most stable versions of packaged software. This greatly reduces the risk of crashes and errors. The downside is… Python 2.6. Or Apache 2.2. Or MySQL 5.1. Switching to CentOS 7 is difficult, because there is no inplace upgrade.

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Python 2.7 for CentOS 6
4.8 (96%) 5 votes

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